HISTORIC SITES

History lives and breathes in Lake Hartwell Country. Come explore some incredible and significant pieces of history that have shaped our region and our nation. Discover antebellum homes, historic churches, and even a working grist mill.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES

Fort Rutledge

Website

GPS Coordinates:

34.669173, -82.850841

Fort Rutledge is the site of the Battle of Seneca Old Town, which took place in 1776. In the present day, Clemson's Tillman Hall stands on the site of Fort Rutledge. Photo courtesy of Clemson University

Hanover House

Website

150 Garden Trail OR, 530 Garden Trail, Clemson, SC 29634

Built in 1716, the Hanover House is a French Huguenot House that was originally constructed in present day Berkeley County in the South Carolina Lowcountry. It was moved to its current location in the 1940's.​ Photo courtesy of the Hanover House

Hopewell Plantation

Website

GPS Coordinates:

34.654279, -82.836720

The Hopewell Plantation was built prior to 1776 and was home to Andrew Pickens Jr., the son of Captain Andrew Pickens. Photo courtesy of Clemson University

Old Stone Church

Website

101 Stone Cir

Clemson, SC 29631

Built in 1802, Old Stone Church is the final resting place of Captain Andrew Pickens, who was crucial to the Revolutionary War. Photo courtesy of Old Stone Church

Oconee Station

Website

500 Oconee Station Rd

Walhalla, SC 29691

Oconee Station State Historic Site is managed by South Carolina State Parks. There were Revolutionary War fights that took place in the area around Oconee Station. Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks

Tamassee Town (Ring Fight) Historical Marker

Website

GPS Coordinates:

34° 52.98′ N, 83° 2.91′ W

This marks the site of the "Ring Fight" on August 12th, 1776, which was fought by the Cherokee and the South Carolina Militia under Andrew Pickens. Photo courtesy of Historical Marker Database

Benjamin Cleveland Marker

Website

GPS Coordinates:

34° 36.783′ N, 83° 11.617′ W

Colonel Benjamin Cleveland was a Revolutionary War hero, helping to lead the Overmountain Men to victory in the battle of King's Mountain. Photo courtesy of Historical Marker Database